Thursday, March 15, 2018

Ethics and Archiving the Web

I wanted to draw attention to what looks like a very interesting conference, Rhizome's National Forum on Ethics and Archiving the Web, March 22-24 at the New Museum in New York:
The dramatic rise in the public’s use of the web and social media to document events presents tremendous opportunities to transform the practice of social memory.

Web archives can serve as witness to crimes, corruption, and abuse; they are powerful advocacy tools; they support community memory around moments of political change, cultural expression, or tragedy. At the same time, they can cause harm and facilitate surveillance and oppression.

As new kinds of archives emerge, there is a pressing need for dialogue about the ethical risks and opportunities that they present to both those documenting and those documented. This conversation becomes particularly important as new tools, such as Rhizome’s Webrecorder software, are developed to meet the changing needs of the web archiving field.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

The "Grand Challenges" of Curation and Preservation

I'm preparing for a meeting next week at the MIT Library on the "Grand Challenges" of digital curation and preservation. MIT, and in particular their library and press, have a commendable tradition of openness, so I've decided to post my input rather than submit it privately. My version of the challenges is below the fold.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Techno-hype part 2.5

Last November I wrote Techno-hype part 2 on cryptocurrencies and blockchains, reviewing David Gerard's excellent book Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain: Bitcoin, Blockchain, Ethereum & Smart Contracts. A lot has happened since, so its time for an update. Below the fold, I look at three examples of how far these technologies are from being "ready for prime time":
  • The Lightning Network, which is supposed to allow Bitcoin to scale to billions of transactions.
  • IOTA, which is supposed to be a blockchain capable of supporting the Internet of Things.
  • Ethereum, which is supposed to be the infrastructure for "smart contracts".

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Archival Media: Not a Good Business

Thinking more about DNA's Niche in the Storage Market led me to focus on some problems with the market for archival media in general, not just DNA. The details are below the fold.

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

"Nobody cared about security"

There's a common meme that ascribes the parlous state of security on the Internet to the fact that in the ARPAnet days "nobody cared about security". It is true that in the early days of the ARPAnet security wasn't an important issue; everybody involved knew everybody else face-to-face. But it isn't true that the decisions taken in those early days hampered the deployment of security as the Internet took the shape we know today in the late 80s and early 90s. In fact the design decisions taken in the ARPAnet days made the deployment of security easier. The main reason for today's security nightmares is quite different.

I know because I was there, and to a small extent involved. Follow me below the fold for the explanation.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Brief Talk at Video Game Preservation Workshop

I was asked to give a brief talk to the Video Game Preservation Workshop: Setting the Stage for Multi-Partner Projects at the Stanford Library, discussing the technical and legal aspects of cooperation on preserving software via emulation. Below the fold is an edited text of the talk with links to the sources.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Notes from FAST18

I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.