Thursday, February 16, 2017

Postel's Law again

Eight years ago I wrote:
In RFC 793 (1981) the late, great Jon Postel laid down one of the basic design principles of the Internet, Postel's Law or the Robustness Principle:
"Be conservative in what you do; be liberal in what you accept from others."
Its important not to lose sight of the fact that digital preservation is on the "accept" side of Postel's Law,
Recently, discussion on a mailing list I'm on focused on the downsides of Postel's Law. Below the fold, I try to explain why most of these downsides don't apply to the "accept" side, which is the side that matters for digital preservation.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

RFC 4810

A decade ago next month Wallace et al published RFC 4810 Long-Term Archive Service Requirements. Its abstract is:
There are many scenarios in which users must be able to prove the existence of data at a specific point in time and be able to demonstrate the integrity of data since that time, even when the duration from time of existence to time of demonstration spans a large period of time. Additionally, users must be able to verify signatures on digitally signed data many years after the generation of the signature. This document describes a class of long-term archive services to support such scenarios and the technical requirements for interacting with such services.
Below the fold, a look at how it has stood the test of time.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Coronal Mass Ejections (again)

Back in 2014 I blogged about one of digital preservation's less well-known risks, coronal mass ejections (CME).  Additional information accumulated in the comments. Last October:
"President Barack Obama .. issued an Executive Order that defines what the nation’s response should be to a catastrophic space weather event that takes out large portions of the electrical power grid, resulting in cascading failures that would affect key services such as water supply, healthcare, and transportation.
Two recent studies bought the risk back into focus and convinced me that my 2014 post was too optimistic. Below the fold, more gloom and doom.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Preservable emulations

This post is an edited extract from my talk at last year's IIPC meeting. This part was the message I was trying to get across, but I buried the lede at the tail end. So I'm repeating it here to try and make the message clear.

Emulation technology will evolve through time. The way we expose emulations on the Web right now means that this evolution will break them. We're supposed to be preserving stuff, but the way we're doing it isn't preservable. We need to expose emulations to the Web in a future-proof way, a way whereby they can be collected, preserved and reanimated using future emulation technologies. Below the fold, I explain what is needed using the analogy of PDFs.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Rick Whitt on Digital Preservation

Google's Rick Whitt has published "Through A Glass, Darkly" Technical, Policy, and Financial Actions to Avert the Coming Digital Dark Ages (PDF), a very valuable 114-page review of digital preservation aimed at legal and policy audiences. Below the fold, some encomia and some quibbles (but much less than 114 pages of them).

Thursday, January 19, 2017

The long tail of non-English science

Ben Panko's English Is the Language of Science. That Isn't Always a Good Thing is based on Languages Are Still a Major Barrier to Global Science, a paper in PLOS Biology by Tatsuya Amano, Juan P. González-Varo and William J. Sutherland. Panko writes:
For the new study, Amano's team looked at the entire body of research available on Google Scholar about biodiversity and conservation, starting in the year 2014. Searching with keywords in 16 languages, the researchers found a total of more than 75,000 scientific papers. Of those papers, more than 35 percent were in languages other than English, with Spanish, Portuguese and Chinese topping the list.

Even for people who try not to ignore research published in non-English languages, Amano says, difficulties exist. More than half of the non-English papers observed in this study had no English title, abstract or keywords, making them all but invisible to most scientists doing database searches in English.
Below the fold, how this problem relates to work by the LOCKSS team.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Gresham's Law

Jeffrey Beall, who has done invaluable work identifying predatory publishers and garnered legal threats for his pains, reports that:
Hyderabad, India-based open-access publisher OMICS International is on a buying spree, snatching up legitimate scholarly journals and publishers, incorporating them into its mega-fleet of bogus, exploitative, and low-quality publications. ... OMICS International is on a mission to take over all of scholarly publishing. It is purchasing journals and publishers and incorporating them into its evil empire. Its strategy is to saturate scholarly publishing with its low-quality and poorly-managed journals, aiming to squeeze out and acquire legitimate publishers.
Below the fold, a look at how OMICS demonstrates the application of Gresham's Law to academic publishing.